Regardless of your faith, spirituality, or lack thereof, we hope this virtual space is meaningful for you, and we invite you to honor Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg in whatever way you feel moved. Please use this form to share your remembrance, and it will be anonymously posted here. There is also a physical memorial space in the Sacred Space of the Numen Lumen Pavilion.

“May her memory be a blessing…”

 

The passing of RBG marks the loss of an inspiring leader, progressive icon, and tenacious feminist. Throughout her early career as a lawyer and 27 years on the Supreme Court, Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg was a trailblazer for women’s rights, a force for change in the unfair systems legislating gender and sex, and a defender of voting rights and civil rights. Her willpower, intelligence, and grace will be remembered as those of us here continue her legacy in our own fights for change.

 

We have created this space for memorial, not to deify a single person, but to honor RBG’s life as an important part of our history. We also wish to acknowledge, honor, and uplift her Jewish identity as a lasting part of her legacy. Her passing at sundown on Rosh Hashanah feels both poignant and heartwarming, and we reflect on it as part of her story.

 

Justice Ginsburg on Rosh Hashanah in 2017: "The Jewish religion is an ethical religion. That is, we are taught to do right, to love mercy, do justice, not because there's gonna be any reward in heaven or punishment in hell. We live righteously because that's how people should live."

 

. . . . .

 

In this space, both physical and virtual, we invite you to honor her in whatever way is most meaningful to you. Feel free to:

 

  • Light a candle in the Sacred Space or wherever you are.

  • Write a note of remembrance, a favorite quote of RBG’s, or an intention to continue the work 

  • Place a stone in the Sacred Space or in a place that is meaningful to you


 

“May her memory be a revolution…”


 

Additional Resources for Meditation:

Regardless of your faith, spirituality, or lack thereof, we hope this virtual space is meaningful for you, and we invite you to honor Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg in whatever way you feel moved. Please use this form to share your remembrance, and it will be anonymously posted here. There is also a physical memorial space in the Sacred Space of the Numen Lumen Pavilion.

RBG is one of my sheroes. I was fortunate to be raised by feminists. My mother and grandmother helped me understand how much the world has changed, because of sheroes like RBG, and also how much work we (including us men!) still have to do to dismantle structures that oppress women. RBG really lived out the truth that women's rights are human rights. She's best known as a champion for women's rights, but we have also lost a champion for LGBTQIA+ rights, voting rights, and civil rights for all persons. She was tenacious and notorious and also capable of deep friendship with people very different from herself. May her memory be a blessing and an inspiration to all of us to continue the work.

-Joel Harter, Associate University Chaplain

Justice Ginsburg validated for me the yearning to be a mother as well as having a career. She said you couldn’t have it all, all of the time. But, you could have it all, at different times. I credit her for being a trailblazer for working moms. I am grateful for this space and I’m committed to continuing the work by showing up fully for my job as well as showing up fully for my family, just at different times. May my sweet daughter grow up in a world that embraces FIERCE women.

"Fight for the things you care about, but do it in a way that will lead others to join you." I find myself sad and angry as I process the loss of RBG. The grief of losing such a monumental icon is devastating enough, but it feels like there's no time to only mourn. I'm tired of feeling like we have to fight all the time. We do not have time to simply grieve her loss because her absence from this world has significant political repercussions. The partisanship of the matter is frustrating, and it is disheartening to me that her legacy cannot be independent of what happens next. However, Justice Ginsburg fought. She continued the fight in the face of so many adversities. She did her share, and now it's this generation's turn to continue the work. This loss is hard to articulate, but I find renewed hope and inspiration in my peers and fellow feminists that are ready to keep fighting for intersectionality, equity, and justice.

I’m not sure we can fully comprehend how extraordinary it was that Justice Ginsburg accomplished what she did, particularly in her earlier days as one of the “10,000 Men of Harvard” and the landmark tax case she argued that dismantled dozens of other discriminatory laws in the early 1970s. I was a child in the 1970s. That I was not considered equal to my brother was something I felt viscerally, even at that young age. Given the overwhelming power imbalance that women faced at that time – in every institution – it is amazing that women ever made progress at all. I am eternally grateful to Justice Ginsburg for being a pioneer in gender equality under the law, paving the way for others to continue the work. Her brilliance, her commitment, her steadfastness and grace in the face of insurmountable obstacles is an inspiration for us all. We must continue on the road she paved and declare “I dissent” to any who would take us backwards. Thank you, RBG.

 

The Truitt Center - Numen Lumen Pavilion 

301 E Haggard Ave

Elon, NC 27244

(336) 278-7729

truittcenter@elon.edu

https://www.elon.edu/u/truitt-center